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Blandford Town Museum

Blandford Museum houses and displays artefacts from Blandford Forum and the surrounding Villages.      

We are open every Monday to Saturday, 10:00 to 16:00 from 1st April until the end of October. Entry is Free.

 

2017 invite to opening

 

 

Blandford Museum 2017 Season Opening

Saturday, April 1st at 10 am

Refreshments will be served

 

 Blandford Archaeology Club Talk

16th March 2017

7:30pm at the Parish Rooms 

archaeology mary rose

 


 

paul hyland flyerBlandford Museum 2017 Solly Lecture 

Ralegh's Last Journey

Blandford Parish Centre, 30th March at 7:00 for 7:30pm

Paul Hyland’s Ralegh’s Last Journey (HarperCollins), was enthusiastically reviewed:

  “An absolute jewel…packed with intelligent and thought-provoking material” JOHN SIMPSON

 “A masterful tale of skullduggery, deception and mystery…told from original sources…

 which brings an electrifying immediacy to the unfolding events” 

GILES MILTON Living History  PICK OF THE MONTH

 “Moving in its portrait of a mind at the end of its tether, Hyland’s  

account gives us a new perspective on Ralegh as man and explorer” NICK RENNISON Sunday Times

  “A little-known slice of a well-known life…challenges many of the assumptions…demonstrates that

the subject’s path to death is as important as the path through life” DEA BIRKETT Independent

  “What should have been a quick trip wound up taking nearly threeweeks and was,

as Paul Hyland makes clear in his engaging account,  

more than a little fraught.  High treason?  More like low comedy... 

Mr Hyland narrates the whole ignominious episode with aplomb” Economist

 “Paul Hyland was inspired to write this book on coming across Stucley’s document

 of self-vindication…he also writes of the curious involvement of the

French acting ambassador Le Clerc, and convincingly reveals that Manoury was at the heart of it”

 RALEIGH TREVELYAN Times Literary Supplement

  “A brilliant example of a recurring type in English politics, the arrogant court favourite who fell from the heavens,

 gained reinstatement but fell again in a shower of sparks” ROBIN BLAKE Financial Times